Japanese anemone, slender and elegant

Pink japanese anemones with white fringes

Japanese anemone is a perennial with remarkable fall blooming.

Key Japanese anemone facts

NameAnemone japonica
FamilyRanunculaceae, pasqueflower
Type – tuberous perennial

Height – 5 to 12 inches (5 to 30 cm)
Exposure – full sun, part sun
Soil – ordinary, well drained

Flowering – August to October

Care, from planting to blooming, is easy and the ornamental impact is guaranteed.

Planting Japanese anemone

Planting Japanese anemone requires light and well drained soil, sun but not too much heat which would tend to burn the leaves.

  • From tubers, plant in fall at a depth of 4 inches (10 cm).
    Planting also possible in spring if you’re able to water more regularly at the beginning.
  • Keep a depth of at least 3 inches (7-8 cm) and space tubers around 24 to 32 inches (60 to 80 cm) apart.
  • Propagate through crown division at the beginning of spring or just before winter.
    Look up our advice on dividing perennials.

Pruning and caring for Japanese anemone

You must remove wilted flowers regularly (deadheading) in order to boost flower-bearing.

  • Before winter, let a few flowers ripen into seeds so that you’ll have new sprouts in spring.

Japanese anemone abominates powdery mildew, that white powder that covers the leaves.

Learn more about Japanese anemone

Japanese anemone is one of the cutest flowers to bloom in fall. Slender and elegant, it bows to the caress of the first autumn gales and decorates our gardens and decks from the end of summer up to the first frost spells.

They are perfect towards the back of perennial beds for the taller species, or along edges and in rocky ground for smaller ones.

Sometimes invasive because it is self-sowing, you won’t have any trouble restraining its growth.

  • Its late flowering is magnificent, and their flowers are usually pink, red or white.
  • Its leaves, elegantly contoured, offer flower bouquets a nice touch of deep green.

Smart tip about Japanese anemone

Watch out if you have children around because this plant is poisonous.

White japanese anemones in a field


Credits for images shared to Nature & Garden (all edits by Gaspard Lorthiois):
Close-up of Japanese anemones by Kasia under Pixabay license
Field of japanese anemone by Alois Grundner under Pixabay license